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Bruschetta




Before you get started you'll need to head over to my basic shio koji recipe and have that ready.


This is probably the clearest expression of what koji can do to enhance the baseline flavours that are already present in good food and good recipes.


Bruschetta is, for me at least, a super simple recipe that just focuses on the quality of the ingredients. Good stuff in, good stuff out. I don't generally adopt any parmesan, garlic or black pepper. But if you like that stuff, get it in there. Add some mozzarella. Live your bruschetta dreams. No judgment here.


What you need:


- Good tomatoes. (Splash out. This is a tomato based dish. Get those weird shaped heritage ones from the guy wearing hemp and wellies at the farmer's market.)


- Basil.


- Tasty bread. (I opt for ciabatta normally, but I'm no purist. Whatever you are feeling.)


- Olive oil.


- Vinegar. (Balsamic or white wine is good. But just anything to add bit of acid.)


What you do:


Slice the tomatoes aiming for about 1-2mm. Brush generously with shio koji. Set aside for about 10 minutes at room temperature. While the tomatoes are getting tasty, slice some bread and toast lightly on both sides. Plate up the bread and rub one side with olive oil.


Pat down the tomatoes with a kitchen towel to remove most of the shio koji and the water that has been released*. Don't worry if you leave some little chunky bits of shio koji on. They are like cheeky little nuggets of savoury goodness, but too many will overpower everything.


Top the bread with the tomatoes. Chiffonade or tear a handful of basil and top the tomatoes. Add a dash or three of vinegar and an optional glue of olive oil on top.


Eat it with your hands like the wild, free, food lover that you are and bask in the delicious glory of koji.


*The release of water is the is the same process as simple salting. The salt in the shio koji pulls out the water present in the tomatoes. Try to dab off most of the liquid to avoid the dreaded soggy bread.